Author

Lisa Battle

ORCID Identifier(s)

0009-0000-0531-9000

Graduation Semester and Year

2023

Language

English

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Social Work

Department

Social Work

First Advisor

Diane Mitschke

Abstract

Social workers will encounter grief, death, and dying in their professional careers. Whether or not it is integral to the practice setting, it is integral to life, and clients in all settings will be impacted by grief and death. Rapidly increasing research in this area has uncovered grief and death as an important competency that new social workers are lacking (Pomeroy et al., 2019). This shortfall impacts social workers through increased risk of vicarious grief and trauma, and their clients through decreased level of care provided (Richmond et al., 2021). Extricating social workers and clients from this burden is a simple solution—an increased focus on death education for social work students and practitioners. Even brief courses given to practitioners increased confidence and client outcomes (Bear & Chandran, 2019). The question that remains is whether social work students agree with new practitioners on the necessity of death education. In this study, the attitudes and interests of current social work students are examined through a multi-method exploratory study conducted at a large, public, urban, Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) in the United States.

Keywords

Grief education, Death education

Disciplines

Social and Behavioral Sciences | Social Work

License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Comments

Degree granted by The University of Texas at Arlington

Included in

Social Work Commons

Share

COinS