Graduation Semester and Year

2019

Language

English

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Daniel S Levine

Abstract

Temporal dilation and temporal contraction are perceived as duration lasting longer or shorter than the standard time unit, respectively. Social, cognitive, and emotional context influences temporal perception such that socially stressful or cognitively demanding tasks distort the perception of time. In the present study, subjects (N = 123) first experienced a state of mindfulness, reported to cause temporal dilation (Kramer et al., 2013) and then performed a demanding cognitive task, reported to cause temporal contraction (Block et al., 2010). Subjects watched either a guided mindfulness video (experimental) or a relaxing music video (control). Subjects then estimated the duration of the video. They then completed either a 1-back (easy) or a 3-back (hard) working memory task and estimated the time it took for their respective n-back condition. Results indicate that after controlling for arousal level and task difficulty, the negative outcome of temporal contraction (i.e. poor performance) was buffered by experiencing temporal dilation (mindfulness), β = -.43, t(116) = -3.43, p = .001, sr2 = .08. Our study suggests that experiencing the mindful moment before a cognitively demanding task may restore performance via distorting time perception.

Keywords

Time perception, Mindful meditation, Temporal distortions, Working memory

Disciplines

Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Comments

Degree granted by The University of Texas at Arlington

Included in

Psychology Commons

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