ORCID Identifier(s)

0000-0003-1345-6405

Graduation Semester and Year

2020

Language

English

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Jared B Kenworthy

Second Advisor

Perry N. Fuchs

Abstract

This study investigated intergroup distinctiveness motives (IDM) as a function of experimental manipulations of remote positive contact and reciprocal intimate self-disclosure (RISD). Using a confederate posing as an outgroup member, I predicted that these variables would interact to negatively impact IDM scores. All participants were Christian-identifying university students who previously completed a baseline IDM survey regarding Muslims. This study involved an online essay exchange with an unseen confederate who was posing as a Muslim. The positive contact manipulation involved confederates giving positive (or neutral) feedback for participant essays. There was no main effect of positive contact on IDM scores. The RISD manipulation involved an exchange of essays with content about a private and fond childhood memory. This manipulation also resulted in a null effect on IDM scores. There was no interaction between positive contact and RISD. Several explanations are offered to better understand the null effects.

Keywords

Intimate disclosure, Remote contact, Distinctiveness, Prejudice, Intergroup relations, Intergroup distinctiveness, Reciprocal disclosure, Positive contact

Disciplines

Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Comments

Degree granted by The University of Texas at Arlington

Included in

Psychology Commons

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