ORCID Identifier(s)

0000-0002-7412-2508

Graduation Semester and Year

2023

Language

English

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Quantitative Biology

Department

Biology

First Advisor

Todd Castoe

Abstract

The field of population genomics has been mainly applied to questions centered around understanding molecular variation, impacts of evolutionary processes, and the history of populations. Here I leverage population genomic techniques across two different systems to understand patterns of disease transmission across heavily monitored and controlled parasite populations and consequences of hybridization between divergent rattlesnake lineages. I employed multiple genome sequencing techniques with new methods to infer close-order relatedness from highly inbred human blood fluke populations in order to understand transmission pathways across a region experiencing a resurgence in disease. I then use a comparative population genomic approach by sampling other countries that have less control efforts to look for patterns of control-driven selection within our study region. Finally, I use reduced representation sequencing across a rattlesnake hybrid zone to understand the underlying evolutionary impact hybrid fitness. Collectively, this work provides an example of how population genomic can be utilized to answer a diverse range of questions ranging from selection patterns on parasites undergoing intense control efforts to the consequences of hybridization across millions of years.

Keywords

Population genomics

Disciplines

Biology | Life Sciences

Comments

Degree granted by The University of Texas at Arlington

Available for download on Saturday, May 10, 2025

Included in

Biology Commons

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