Author

Nicole Hales

ORCID Identifier(s)

0000-0003-0405-6944

Graduation Semester and Year

2019

Language

English

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Quantitative Biology

Department

Biology

First Advisor

Todd Castoe

Abstract

The advent of Next Generation Sequencing has been an extremely powerful tool in transforming the way we answer biological questions today. With the price per base pair continuously decreasing, and throughput, sequencing speed and quality of sequence reads increasing, NGS has allowed scientists to develop novel biological applications that have led to significant findings. During my dissertation, I leveraged several non-model organisms across various projects to develop new approaches of NGS to study a broad range of biological questions, including (1) understanding the genetic processes underlying transgenerational plasticity in Daphnia, (2) using Hi-C sequencing to study vertebrate genome structure and how chromatin and transcription factors interact to regulate snake venom, and (3) resurrecting archived, very low-quality samples to understand patterns of transmission in parasites. Collectively, this worked serves as a demonstration of how NGS can be utilized across multiple systems to answer broad biological questions.

Keywords

Next-generation sequencing, Transgenerational plasticity, Venom regulation, Parasites, Whole genome sequencing, HiC sequencing

Disciplines

Biology | Life Sciences

Comments

Degree granted by The University of Texas at Arlington

Included in

Biology Commons

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